Quick Thoughts

NJ Psychological Association challenges APA Clinical Practice Guideline for the Treatment of PTSD

NJPA statement reflects concerns of psychodynamic therapistswho fear the loss of their livelihood, insurance companies not funding their work, and the opportunity for clients to receive psychodynamic and other treatments that were not included. The statement also suggests that all treatments yield results and that RCT’s should not have been as strongly considered in the development of the Guideline.

Probing the claim a black, working-class man would have to call 80 psychotherapists to get an appointment.

Study of returned calls from psychotherapists for requests for first appointments got lots of attention in social media but were claims accurate?

How APA’s rating of acceptance and commitment therapy for psychosis got downgraded from “strong” to “modest” efficacy

My blog post a few years ago caused a downgrading of ACT for psychosis that stuck. This shows the meaninglessness of APA ratings of psychotherapies as evidence-supported.

Patients writing about their health condition were abused by a peer reviewer and silenced by The BMJ

Should patients submitting manuscripts concerning health conditions provide proof of their diagnoses, such as medical records or letters from their physicians? Should The BMJ apologize to these patients and their academic collaborator co-authors, given that no such apology has been forthcoming from the Action Editor?

Comments from a Buddhist about mindfulness as a therapeutic practice

A Buddhist practitioner mindfulness questions whether the technique is meant to be therapeutic.

Conflicts of interest in Cochrane reports on psychological interventions

o Recently I was honored to join an esteemed group of international colleagues in writing to the Cochrane about the Collaboration’s inattention to conflicts of interest in reviews of psychotherapeutic interventions. The Collaboration has been particularly lax in dealing with conflicts of interest with respect to psychological interventions for “chronic fatigue syndrome” and medically unexplained […]

Simon Wessely’s muddled views of the good psychotherapy trial: I. Misunderstanding control groups

Simon Wessely's continued praise of PACE chronic fatigue syndrome trial suggest he is out of touch with current standards for clinical trials.

CBT versus psychodynamic therapy for depression: One sentence changes the whole story

One sentence changes the whole story of a comparison between cognitive and psychodynamic therapy for depression.

Are mindfulness and cognitive behavioral interventions for smoking cessation obsolete?

Why did a trial of intensive mindfulness-based treatment and cognitive behavior therapy produce null results?