Quick Thoughts

Systematic review shows no improvement in quality of mindfulness research in 16 years

Should we still take claims about mental health benefits of mindfulness with a grain of  salt? A systematic review by one of mindfulness training's key promoters suggests maybe so.

Checking graphs in articles: Binge drinking in women dramatically increasing, while binge drinking in men decreasing.

A reminder to check tables and graphs in articles. Don’t just gloss over the valuable information they may display.

Confirmation bias in JAMA Psychiatry article concerning neighborhood-level variation in risk of psychosis

This article represents a good teaching example of confirmation bias, whereby weak findings are interpreted as consistent with the dominant view in the literature.

No, seats on the US Institute of Medicine advisory committees are not for sale, despite what the Dutch Parliament was told

How the Executive Director of the Health and Medicine Division of the IoM responded to Professor Pim van Gool, the President of the Dutch Health Council disparaging the reputation of the IoM in testimony to the Dutch Parliament.

Probing the claim a black, working-class man would have to call 80 psychotherapists to get an appointment.

Study of returned calls from psychotherapists for requests for first appointments got lots of attention in social media but were claims accurate?

At least 3 reasons you don’t have to read Understanding Psychosis and Schizophrenia 2

Has the British Psychological Society lost its audience for misrepresentatingn of serious mental disorder?

Beware of the pinkwashing of suicide prevention

Cause marketing of cosmetics to prevent suicide could mark the return of exploitation of a good cause for profit. Just as with we learned with Breast Cancer Pink Ribbon campaigns, we need to ask questions about where the profits are going and whether we should object.

How advice gurus sell more products when corporations discover mindfulness training doesn’t work

Corporations purchasing expensive mindfulness training packages for corporate leadership and rank and file employees inevitably discover they do not obtain the benefits that are claimed for mindfulness. How can this become a strategic opportunity for advice gurus to sell more products?

Is it raining on the suicide prevention parade to point out that promising interventions are not effective?

Why we should try to prove ourselves wrong as quickly as possible when getting excited about ambitious programs to prevent suicide.