CDC – Don’t just discreetly change recommendations for treating chronic fatigue syndrome, publicize the changes!

 

Original Title: BLDG21_0023.jpgNo one is going to notice important changes to Center for Disease Control recommendations for treating chronic fatigue syndrome unless explanations are often and disseminated.

Unless you stumbled on it by accident, you had to be a routine watcher of the CDC website to have noticed a discrete last summer in the agency’s recommendations for treating chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis.

CDC Removes Reference to Disputed ME/CFS Therapies From Website

Last summer: David Tuller University of California, Berkeley lecturer in public health and journalism and activists noted

The CDC website now advises patients to develop an individual management strategy with a health care provider and warns them not to overexert themselves. (However, a separate page about ME/CFS in the CDC’s features section still includes advice about “graded exercise.”)

And

In an email sent in response to questions about the changes, the CDC did not specifically mention graded exercise therapy and cognitive behavior therapy, or concerns about the PACE trial, but said that it rewrote the website section to avoid “confusion” associated with its previous recommendations and to eliminate medical jargon.

“We continue to believe that exercise can be useful for some ME/CFS patients, and also are trying to emphasize that people need to be careful not to overdo it and push themselves so far that it harms their health,” the emailed statement reads. “We also state that talking to a therapist to help find strategies to cope with their illness may be helpful. We know from our past discussions with patients and their loved ones that there has been confusion about what we recommend related to exercise and therapy. We hope that the updated website provides more clarity.”

At the time, the CDC made in promised to Tuller and the patient community that has not been kept:

The CDC also promised to disseminate information about the website changes once the agency has updated the companion pages for health professionals.

Now, a new article by Tuller and science and health journalist Julie Rehmeyer asks

Why did it take the CDC so long to reverse course on debunked treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome?

I highly recommend this article and agree:

While the CDC deserves credit for having removed information based on bad science, that alone is not enough. The agency must also undo the damage it has caused.

I agree well as with Tuller and Rehmeyer’s three recommendations to the CDC:

Acknowledge more publicly that the CDC got things wrong.

And

CDC must actively disseminate the news that it no longer recommends these two ineffective and possibly harmful therapies and that no legitimate evidence supports their use.

And

Reach out directly to health care and medical organizations, such as Kaiser Permanente and the Mayo Clinic, to urge them to stop recommending the treatments and ensure that the information they provide is truly up to date. That outreach should include the UK’s National Institute for Health and Care Excellence.