Quick Thoughts

Screening for Distress and Depression vs Optimizing Support and Compassion in Medical Care

My upcoming talks at the Dutch International Congress on Insurance Medicine 2017

Unethical: Why Bristol University SMILE trial should not have been conducted with chronically ill children

If it should have been conducted at all, the first clinical trial of Lightning Process should not have been conducted with chronically ill children. Safety and efficacy had neither been established with adults, nor healthy children.

CDC – Don’t just discreetly change recommendations for treating chronic fatigue syndrome, publicize the changes!

  No one is going to notice important changes to Center for Disease Control recommendations for treating chronic fatigue syndrome unless explanations are often and disseminated. Unless you stumbled on it by accident, you had to be a routine watcher of the CDC website to have noticed a discrete last summer in the agency’s recommendations […]

Bristol University should start cleaning up its clinical trial registries by publishing two psychosocial intervention studies

A story in the feisty Bristol Cable revealed Bristol University ignores its responsibilities to publish results of clinical trials. A follow up story announced the university’s pledge to remedy the situation. The investigation of hidden data excluded psychosocial intervention trials. But here are two trials for which publication is overdue.

Beware of the pinkwashing of suicide prevention

Cause marketing of cosmetics to prevent suicide could mark the return of exploitation of a good cause for profit. Just as with we learned with Breast Cancer Pink Ribbon campaigns, we need to ask questions about where the profits are going and whether we should object.

How advice gurus sell more products when corporations discover mindfulness training doesn’t work

Corporations purchasing expensive mindfulness training packages for corporate leadership and rank and file employees inevitably discover they do not obtain the benefits that are claimed for mindfulness. How can this become a strategic opportunity for advice gurus to sell more products?

Psychological interventions do not reduce pain, despite claims of proponents

A provocative review finds a “lack of strong supporting empirical evidence for the effectiveness of psychological treatments for pain management.”

Rising early career female academics and second-to-last authorship

Are female early career academics getting less credit for work done on behalf of (usually male) faculty  who get unearned senior authorship?

Ten things wrong with Google’s effort to help people suffering with depression

A number of websites are echoing a press release from Google about its intention to help people suffering from depression. There are lots of reasons to doubt the effort will accomplish much. Here are ten of them.

A longer than needed look at ’11 minutes of mindfulness can reduce drinking by bottle of wine a week.’

Why University College, London issued embargoed press release for an already published mindfulness study is more interesting than the insipid study itself.