Mind the Brain

Lessons we need to learn from a Lancet Psychiatry study of the association between exercise and mental health

The closer we look at a heavily promoted study of exercise and mental health, the more its flaws become obvious. There is little support for the most basic claims being made – despite the authors marshaling enormous attention to the study.

Why Lancet Psychiatry study didn’t show locked inpatient wards ineffective in reducing suicide

A well-orchestrated publicity campaign for a Lancet Psychiatry article promoted the view that locked inpatient wards are ineffective in reducing suicide. This interpretation is not supported by data in the actual paper, but plays to some entrenched political stances and prejudices. Hype and distortions in conventional and social media about this article are traceable directly … Continue reading "Why Lancet Psychiatry study didn’t show locked inpatient wards ineffective in reducing suicide"

Uninterpretable: Fatal flaws in PACE Chronic Fatigue Syndrome follow-up study

Earlier decisions by the investigator group preclude valid long-term follow-up evaluation of CBT for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). At the outset, let me say that I’m skeptical whether we can hold the PACE investigators responsible for the outrageous headlines that have been slapped on their follow-up study and on the comments they have made in … Continue reading "Uninterpretable: Fatal flaws in PACE Chronic Fatigue Syndrome follow-up study"

Delusional? Trial in Lancet Psychiatry claims brief CBT reduces paranoid delusions

In this issue of Mind the Brain, I demonstrate a quick assessment of the conduct and reporting of a clinical trial.  The authors claimed in Lancet Psychiatry a “first ever” in targeting “worries” with brief cognitive therapy as a way of reducing persistent persecutory delusions in psychotic persons. A Guardian article written by the first … Continue reading "Delusional? Trial in Lancet Psychiatry claims brief CBT reduces paranoid delusions"