Mind the Brain

How to get a flawed systematic review and meta-analysis withdrawn from publication: a detailed example

Cochrane normally requires authors to agree to withdraw completed reviews that have been published. This withdrawal in the face of resistance from the authors is extraordinary. There is a lot to be learned from this letter and the accompanying documents in terms of Courtney calmly and methodically laying out a compelling case for withdrawal of a review with important clinical practice and policy implications.

Lessons we need to learn from a Lancet Psychiatry study of the association between exercise and mental health

The closer we look at a heavily promoted study of exercise and mental health, the more its flaws become obvious. There is little support for the most basic claims being made – despite the authors marshaling enormous attention to the study.

Hazards of pointing out bad meta-analyses of psychological interventions

  A cautionary tale Psychology has a meta-analysis problem. And that’s contributing to its reproducibility problem. Meta-analyses are wallpapering over many research weaknesses, instead of being used to systematically pinpoint them. – Hilda Bastian Meta-analyses of psychological interventions are often unreliable because they depend on a small number of poor quality, underpowered studies. It is … Continue reading "Hazards of pointing out bad meta-analyses of psychological interventions"

Should have seen it coming: Once high-flying Psychological Science article lies in pieces on the ground

Life is too short for wasting time probing every instance of professional organizations promoting bad science when they have an established record of doing just that. There were lots of indicators that’s what we were dealing with in the Association for Psychological Science (APS) recent campaign for the now discredited and retracted ‘sadness prevents us … Continue reading "Should have seen it coming: Once high-flying Psychological Science article lies in pieces on the ground"

Sex and the single amygdala: A tale almost saved by a peek at the data

So sexy! Was bringing up ‘risky sex’ merely a strategy to publish questionable and uninformative science? My continuing question: Can skeptics who are not specialists, but who are science-minded and have some basic skills, learn to quickly screen and detect questionable science in the journals and media coverage? “You don’t need a weatherman to know … Continue reading "Sex and the single amygdala: A tale almost saved by a peek at the data"