Mind the Brain

How to get a flawed systematic review and meta-analysis withdrawn from publication: a detailed example

Cochrane normally requires authors to agree to withdraw completed reviews that have been published. This withdrawal in the face of resistance from the authors is extraordinary. There is a lot to be learned from this letter and the accompanying documents in terms of Courtney calmly and methodically laying out a compelling case for withdrawal of a review with important clinical practice and policy implications.

Stop using the Adverse Childhood Experiences Checklist to make claims about trauma causing physical and mental health problems

Scores on the adverse childhood experiences (ACE) checklist (or ACC) are widely used in making claims about the causal influence of childhood trauma on mental and physical health problems. Does anyone making these claims bother to look at how the checklist is put together and consider what a summary score might mean?

Did a placebo affect allergic reactions to a pin prick or only in the authors’ minds?

Can placebo effects be harnessed to improve treatment outcomes? Stories of a placebo changing bodily function are important in promoting mind-body medicine, but mostly turn out to be false positives. Was this one an exception?

“It’s certainly not bareknuckle:” Comments to a journalist about a critique of mindfulness research

We can't assume authors of mindfulness studies are striving to do the best possible science, including being prepared for the possibility of being proven incorrect by their results.

“ACT: The best thing [for pain] since sliced bread or the Emperor’s new clothes?”

Reflections on the debate with David Gillanders about Acceptance and Commitment Therapy at the British Pain Society, Glasgow, September 15, 2017