Headspace mindfulness training app no better than a fake mindfulness procedure for improving critical thinking, open-mindedness, and well-being.

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The Headspace app increased users’ critical thinking and open-mindedness. So did practicing a sham mindfulness procedure. Participants simply sat with their eyes closed, but thought they were meditating.

cat_ dreamstime_164683 (300 x 225)Results call into question claims about Headspace  coming from other studies that did not have such a credible, active control group comparison.

Results also call into question the widespread use of standardized self-report measures of mindfulness to establish whether someone is in the state of mindfulness. These measures don’t distinguish between the practice of standard versus fake mindfulness.

Results can be seen as further evidence that practicing mindfulness depends on nonspecific factors (AKA placebo), rather than any active, distinctive ingredient.

Hopefully this study will prompt better studies evaluating the Headspace App, as well as evaluations of mindfulness training more generally, using credible active treatments, rather than no treatment or waitlist controls.

Maybe it is time for a moratorium on trials of mindfulness without such an active control or at least a tempering of claims based on poorly controlled  trials.

This study points to the need for development of more psychometrically sophisticated measures of mindfulness that are not so vulnerable to experiment expectations and demand characteristics.

Until the accumulation of better studies with better measures, claims about the effects of practicing mindfulness ought to be recognized as based on relatively weak evidence.

The study

Noone, C & Hogan,M. Randomised active-controlled trial of effects of online mindfulness intervention on executive control, critical thinking and key thinking dispositionsBMC Psychology, 2018

Trial registration

The study was initially registered in the AEA Social Science Registry before the recruitment was initiated (RCT ID: AEARCTR-0000756; 14/11/2015) and retrospectively registered in the ISRCTN registry (RCT ID: ISRCTN16588423) in line with requirements for publishing the study protocol.

Excerpts from the Abstract

The aim of this study was…investigating the effects of an online mindfulness intervention on executive function, critical thinking skills, and associated thinking dispositions.

Method

Participants recruited from a university were randomly allocated, following screening, to either a mindfulness meditation group or a sham meditation group. Both the researchers and the participants were blind to group allocation. The intervention content for both groups was delivered through the Headspace online application, an application which provides guided meditations to users.

And

Primary outcome measures assessed mindfulness, executive functioning, critical thinking, actively open-minded thinking, and need for cognition. Secondary outcome measures assessed wellbeing, positive and negative affect, and real-world outcomes.

Results

Significant increases in mindfulness dispositions and critical thinking scores were observed in both the mindfulness meditation and sham meditation groups. However, no significant effects of group allocation were observed for either primary or secondary measures. Furthermore, mediation analyses testing the indirect effect of group allocation through executive functioning performance did not reveal a significant result and moderation analyses showed that the effect of the intervention did not depend on baseline levels of the key thinking dispositions, actively open-minded thinking, and need for cognition.

The authors conclude

While further research is warranted, claims regarding the benefits of mindfulness practice for critical thinking should be tempered in the meantime.

Headscape Be used on an iPhone

The active control condition

The sham treatment control condition was embarrassingly straightforward and simple. But as we will see, participants found it credible.

This condition presented the participants with guided breathing exercises. Each session began by inviting the participants to sit with their eyes closed. These exercises were referred to as meditation but participants were not given guidance on how to control their awareness of their body or breath. This approach was designed to control for the effects of expectations surrounding mindfulness and physiological relaxation to ensure that the effect size could be attributed to mindfulness practice specifically. This content was also delivered by Andy Puddicombe and was developed based on previous work by Zeidan and colleagues [55, 57, 58].

What can we conclude about the standard self-report measures of the state of mindfulness?

The study used the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire, which is widely used to assess whether people are in a state of mindfulness. It has been cited almost 4000 times.

Participants assigned to the mindfulness condition had significant changes for all five facets from baseline to follow up: observing, non-reactivity, non-judgment, acting with awareness, and describing. In the absence of a comparison with change in the sham mindfulness group, these pre-post results would seem to suggest that the measure was sensitive to whether participants had practiced mindfulness. However, there were no differences from the changes observed for the participants assigned to mindfulness and those which were simply asked to sit with their eyes closed.

I asked Chris Noone about the questionnaires his group used to assess mindfulness:

The participants genuinely thought they were meditating in the sham condition so I think both non-specific and demand characteristics were roughly equivalent across both groups. I’m also skeptical regarding the ability of the Five-Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (or any mindfulness questionnaire for that matter) to capture anything other than “perceived mindfulness”. The items used in these questionnaires feature similar content to the scripts used by the people delivering the mindfulness (and sham) guided meditations. The improvement in critical thinking across both groups is just a mix of learning across a semester and habituation to the task (as the same problems were posed at both measurements).

What I like about this trial

The trial provides a critical test of a key claim for mindfulness:

Mindfulness should facilitate critical thinking in higher-education, based on early Buddhist conceptualizations of mindfulness as clarity of thought.

The trial was registered before recruitment and departures from protocol were noted.

Sample size was determined by power analysis.

The study had a closely matched, active control condition, a sham mindfulness treatment.

The credibility and equivalence of this sham condition versus the active treatment under study was repeatedly assessed.

“Manipulation checks were carried out to assess intervention acceptability, technology acceptance and meditation quality 2 weeks after baseline and 4 weeks after baseline.”

The study tested some a priori hypotheses about mediators and moderation:

Analyses were intention to treat.

 How the study conflicts with past studies

Previous studies claimed to show positive effects of mindfulness on aspects of executive functioning [25 and  26]

How the contradiction of past studies by these results is resolved

 “There are many studies using guided meditations similar to those in our mindfulness meditation condition, delivered through smartphone applications [49, 50, 52, 90, 91], websites [92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97] and CDs [98, 99], which show effects on measures of outcomes reliably associated with increases in mindfulness such as depression, anxiety, stress, wellbeing and compassion. There are two things to note about these studies – they tend not to include a measure of dispositional mindfulness (e.g. only 4% of all mindfulness intervention studies reviewed in a recent meta-analysis include such measures at baseline and follow-up; [54]) and they usually employ a weak form of control group such as a no-treatment control or waitlist control [54]. Therefore, even when change in mindfulness is assessed in mindfulness meditation intervention studies, it is usually overestimated and this must be borne in mind when comparing the results of this study with those of previous studies. This combined with generally only moderate correlations with behavioural outcomes [54] suggests that when mindfulness interventions are effective, dispositional measures do not fully capture what has changed.”

The broader take away messages

“Our results show that, for most outcomes, there were significant changes from baseline to follow-up but none which can be specifically attributed to the practice of mindfulness.’

This creative use of a sham mindfulness control condition is a breakthrough that should be widely followed. First, it allowed a fair test of whether mindfulness is any better than another active, credible treatment. Second, because the active treatment was a sham, results provide a challenge to the notion that apparent effects of mindfulness on critical thinking are anything more than a placebo effect.

The Headspace App is enormously popular and successful, based on claims about what benefits its use will provide. Some of these claims may need to be tempered, not only in terms of critical thinking, but effects on well-being.

The Headspace App platform lends itself to such critical evaluations with respect to a sham treatment with a degree of standardization that is not readily possible with face-to-face mindfulness training. This opportunity should be exploited further with other active control groups constructed on the basis of specific hypotheses.

There is far too much research on the practice of mindfulness being done that does not advance understanding of what works or how it works. We need a lot fewer studies, and more with adequate control/comparison groups.

Perhaps we should have a moratorium on evaluations of mindfulness without adequate control groups.

Perhaps articles being aimed at audiences making enthusiastic claims for the benefits of mindfulness should routinely note whether these claims are based on adequately controlled studies. Most are not.


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